How Golfers Stay In Shape

Many are quick to believe golf is a sport that requires little physical dedication but the truth is that an 18 hole round can lead to a calorie burn up to 1,500 calories. Professional golfers, such as Paula Creamer, reports that she works out four to five times a week. Her routine is very mixed-martial arts focused, which strengthen her core and her hips which are key to a golfer. Tiger woods is reported to begin his day with a cardio-based workout, ranging from a 3-mile speed run to bicycling. After that he takes on an hour of workouts, lifting 60-to-70 percent more than his actual body weight. All that, in the time frame of two hours, and that is even before he has his breakfast! Rickie Fowler takes on a tough 6-day workout routine weekly, never missing a workout according to his conditioning coach Chris Noss. On Monday his workouts are focused on power, ranging from twenty minute workouts on a spin bike to dumbbell dead lifts. Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturdays are spent on a 30-to-forty minute workouts on the spin bike. Wednesday is focused on strength and endurance, with workouts like lying leg thrusts and curl grip pull downs. Friday is a full body workout. He only has one day to rest, which is on Sunday when he takes off. Phil Mickelson and these dedicated golfers push their body beyond the limits with the wish to be the best golfers they can possibly be, and Paula Creamer’s hard work paid off when she won the 2010 U.S. Women’s Open at Oakmont. She accredits this as the highlight...

How To Prepare For A PGA Tour

Playing in a competitive golf tournament is stressful and physically demanding. In order to play your best following the advice of Jack Nicklaus who once said, “The difference between being nervous and scared is being prepared.” The question then becomes just how should you prepare for your next tournament? Preparation should follow three distinct paths. One is mental, another physical, and the last is logistical. The game of golf itself is mostly a mental game so preparing emotionally is very important. Some golfers like Phil_Mickelson have found meditation techniques work well to help calm themselves and reduce the impact that stress has on their bodies. Stress releases a flood of hormones into the body that can affect your swing, putting, and the ease the jitters. Mindfulness techniques work to help you get over a bad shot by living in the present and knowing whatever has occurred in the past is gone. Mentally telling yourself that it is okay, and you’ll nail the next shot is important. Also, reward yourself with a discreet fist pump or a silent “attaboy” when you make a good shot. Fear is often the result of the unknown. If possible, arrive at your tournament early and play a few practice rounds without the pressure of competition to gain a familiarity with the course’s layout and quirks. If you work with a swing coach you may want to have them on hand to help you make any minor adjustments. Also, playing alongside someone you know on a personal level can help you relax. Physical conditioning is a very important component of preparation for a tournament. Many...